Friday, October 8, 2010

Recycled Chip Bag Bow

Turn single serve chip bags into gift box bows in a few easy steps.

- Empty single serve chip bag
- Scissors
- Ruler
- Stapler
- Paper clips

1. Wrap your gift with recycled scrap paper and tape shut.

2. To make the bow, Clean out the bag of any left over food. Cut the top and bottom off and toss them. Cut bag in to .75" wide strips.

3. Take 2 of the strips and loop over onto each other. Stack the 2 pieces on top of each other and arrange at at 90 degree angle. Paper clip the pieces together in the center. Repeat for the other strips.

4. Take a piece and loop it around and stack it on top of the stapled pairs from step 3. Staple all of these pieces together and you've made yourself a recycled bow!

5. Attach the bow to the top and your gift is packed with recycling power!

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Got your costume for Halloween? Tell us about it?

What are you or you kid going to be for halloween? I Love Halloween because you can be what ever you want and no one will say any thing about it.

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

How to Finger Knit

Finger knitting is done without needles and is a great way to introduce children to knitting. With their new skill, kids can make scarves, headbands, and toys. The basic concept of knitting is grasped before kids every pick up a knitting needle!
• Ball or Skein of Yarn (Any yarn will do, but chunky, colorful yarn for children is the best.)
• Both Hands
• Plastic Large‐Eye Sewing Needle‐ this not‐sharp needle is perfect for kids.
1. If you are right‐handed, use your left hand to hold the yarn. Lay the yarn across your upturned palm with the tail of the yarn (the end) held between your thumb and forefinger.
2. With the yarn end attached to the ball or skein, weave the yarn through your fingers. Wrap the yarn under your pinky finger, over your ring finger, under your middle finger and over the forefinger.
3. Weave in the opposite direction. Wrap the yarn under your forefinger, over your middle finger, under your ring finger, and over your pinky.
4. Wrap the yarn under all the fingers towards your thumb and over the top back towards the pinky. This should be the top yarn.
5. Starting with the pinky finger, take the bottom woven yarn and pull it over the top (wrapped) yarn.
6. Repeat with remaining three fingers.
7. Repeat steps 4 through 6 until you have the desired length.
8. Pull on the tail of the yarn to tighten the knitting periodically.
9. To finish, cut the yarn, leaving several inches of extra yarn. Take the loops of your fingers. Pull the remaining yarn through the loops and make a knot.

Thursday, February 4, 2010

Winner of this Feb's Monthly gift card drawing

wnepooh37 is the winner of this Feb's Monthly gift card drawing
You have 10 days to claim gift card. Go join or buy in thing trough me to put your name in the monthly drawing.

Monday, January 18, 2010

Burn 500 Calories by Crocheting?!

I recently came across an article on MSN discussing 50 ways to cut 500 calories a day. There are some fun tips and tricks in the article, but one definitely surprised me! Here is #21 on the list:

“21. Get out your knitting needles. An afternoon of knitting can burn more than 500 calories (at a rate of about 100 an hour).”

Okay, so I think it should say “crochet” not “knitting” or at least both, since they are fairly similar. I’m sure if you can burn more than 500 calories knitting, you can do so crocheting too! I think the point is to keep your hands and fingers busy to keep you from over eating when you’re bored. But I never knew you can burn that many calories from crocheting/knitting!! Perhaps the next time someone calls me lazy for sitting around crocheting all day I can tell them I’m exercising

You can read the MSN article here.

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Cold Weather Tips for Pets

This information is not meant to be a substitute for veterinary care.
Always follow the instructions provided by your veterinarian.
Cold Weather is on the way, which means it's time to give Special Attention to your Pets

When the seasons move from summer into fall and winter, people adjust their routines and plan for colder weather. At the same time, take a few minutes to prepare your pets for the changing seasons. The following is a list of dos and don'ts to help you give your pets the cold-weather care they deserve.
Do provide proper shelter:
If you can't keep your dog indoors during winter months, provide an elevated structure with a door to protect pets from wind and weather.
Provide dry, clean bedding materials such as straw or blankets and replace bedding if it becomes damp or wet.
Find a house large enough for your dog to be able to stand up and turn around, but small enough to retain her body heat.
Do provide indoor dogs with a warm sleeping area away from drafts.
Do use caution around bodies of water. Keep pets away from rivers, ponds and lakes as they begin to freeze. Continue to use caution even when the water appears completely frozen.
Do keep hair around paw pads trimmed. Less hair will help keep paws free of ice and snow, which can quickly ball up between footpads and create uncomfortable walking conditions for pets.
Do check paw pads for small cuts and cracks. Consider dog boots for dogs that react negatively to walking on ice and snow - especially dogs that react to snow removal products.
Do clean your dog's paws after walks to remove salt and snow removal chemicals, which can be toxic to pets.
Do check your dog's ears, tail and feet for frostbite. Just as dogs are sensitive to hot summer sidewalks, cold winter walkways may cause pain or contribute to frostbite. A dog that continually lifts individual legs off the ground during a winter walk may feel the effects of frostbite. Frostbitten skin may appear red or gray. If you suspect frostbite, wrap your dog's feet in a blanket or towels to gradually warm them and contact your veterinarian.
Do provide the proper type and amount of food for the season. Dogs housed outdoors and dogs that participate in strenuous outdoor activities may require additional food during colder weather. On the other hand, indoor dogs that exercise less frequently in colder months may need less food.
Do provide adequate fresh, unfrozen water. If your dog lives outside, consider investing in a heated water bowl. Indoor dogs also may require more water to combat dry winter air.
Do invest in a pet sweater for shorthaired breeds. Watch for telltale signs that your pet is cold. Like us, pets will shiver in response to being chilled.
Do keep puppies and older dogs indoors except for short periods of time. As with humans, young and old dogs are more susceptible to the effects of the cold.
Do keep dogs on a leash - especially during bad weather or snowstorms when they can lose their ability to find their way by smell.
Do pay attention to snow removal. Avoid piling snow near fences and creating an escape route for curious pets.
Do keep identification tags updated in the event your dog runs away.
Do clean up antifreeze spills immediately. Many dogs like the sweet smell and taste and, unfortunately, even very small amounts can be lethal to them. If you suspect that your dog has ingested antifreeze, take your dog to your veterinarian immediately. There may be time for Antizol-Vet, an anti-freeze antidote, to help your dog. Also consider using an animal-friendly anti-freeze.
Do maintain your pet's grooming schedule. Regular brushing keeps your dog's coat supple and prepared for the cold. However, when you bathe your pet, be sure to dry his coat thoroughly before allowing him outside.
Do visit your veterinarian for a checkup before the cold weather strikes. Cold weather may exacerbate certain conditions, such as arthritis. Sudden changes in the weather or drops in temperature may affect pets suffering from osteoarthritis.
Don't suddenly house an indoor dog outdoors. Dogs require a month or more (as seasons change) to become accustomed to lower winter temperatures.
Don't keep your dog outside in all conditions. Pay attention to the thermometer. If it dips too far below freezing, it's too cold for any dog - even those accustomed to being outside.
Don't treat all dogs alike. While some breeds such as Alaskan malamutes or huskies may be able to spend long periods out of doors in cold weather, other breeds such as greyhounds or Dobermans to not have the same protective fur.
Don't leave pets alone in cars during cold weather months. When the engine is off, a car can act as a refrigerator, holding in the cold.

Sunday, December 20, 2009

no more orders for Personalized Letters from Santa

we can not longer take orders for Personalized Letters from Santa. sorry the dead line was the 19th of dec. thank you to all that ordered.